News

Mammograms: Are we overdiagnosing small tumors?

June 7, 2017
An analysis of breast cancer data revealed that many small breast cancers have an excellent prognosis because they are inherently slow growing, according to Yale Cancer Center experts. Often, these cancers will not grow large enough to become significant within a patient’s lifetime and subsequently early detection could lead to overdiagnosis, said the reseachers.

In conversation: Joanna Radin on the ‘phenomenon’ of biobanking

June 7, 2017
When HIV/AIDS became a pandemic, epidemiologists wanted to know where it began. In the 1980s, they found their answer in a freezer filled with blood. This blood had been collected in the 1950s from members of indigenous communities in Africa as part of anthropological research on human variation. To this day, that sample is the oldest trace of HIV known to biomedicine. It is what launched Joanna Radin’s interest in the field of biobanking, a means of preserving blood and other tissues for future research.

Yale School of Medicine expands partnership to promote clinical trials and training in Puerto Rico

June 6, 2017
An expanded partnership between the Yale School of Medicine and research institutions in Puerto Rico is set to foster collaborative clinical research and training opportunities in the United States and the territory.

Risk of rupture in small brain aneurysms is low, study finds

June 6, 2017
Aneurysms are often treated as soon as they are discovered to prevent bad outcomes. However, a Yale researcher has found that the risk of small aneurysm rupturing may actually be quite low.

Study: Many athletes with implantable defibrillators can do sports

June 5, 2017
Some young adults have inherited heart conditions that require them to use an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, or ICD. For years, they were told they could not engage in sports more vigorous than golf. But a new study led by a Yale researcher suggests that the risks of participating in sports for athletes with ICDs are actually quite low.

Study identifies potential health care ‘double jeopardy’ for minority patients

June 5, 2017
A new study sheds light on the depth of health care disparities faced by minority populations in the United States. The findings suggest a possible “double jeopardy” for black and Hispanic patients: Not only has it been shown that members of minority groups receive less high-quality, effective care than their peers, they may also be at risk of receiving more low-value, ineffective care.

Tourette-like tics vanish in mice treated with histamine

June 5, 2017
Yale scientists produced increased grooming behavior in mice that may model tics in Tourette syndrome and discovered these behaviors vanish when histamine — a neurotransmitter most commonly associated with allergies — is introduced into their brains.